Wear it

I wear my rainbow laces everywhere and people really do notice. There’s no shortage of t-shirts and badges you can buy with LGBTQ inclusive messages.

Tell your friends

Use your social media accounts to share LGBTQ news stories, role models, campaigns and why it matters to you. You could just share this blog post. Lots of my friends on Facebook are friends I’ve carried with me from school, uni and faith spaces. They may not always hear about LGBTQ inclusion.

Chat with colleagues

Next time you’re in the kitchen, ask them if they know it’s LGBTQ History Month. Or tell them about that really interesting LGBTQ book or article you read.

Make a change

Have you noticed something that can change in your workplace or community group to be more inclusive of LGBTQ people? Email a leader about what’s wrong, how it can be changed and why it’s important. Offer to talk to them more about it in person.

Speak up

The sad reality is it’s not always safe to be a visible role model or ally:

  • Two in five trans people (41 per cent) have experienced a hate crime or incident because of their gender identity in the last 12 months.
  • More than a third of LGBT people (36 per cent) say they don’t feel comfortable walking down the street while holding their partner’s hand (Stonewall, 2017).

You can report any homophobic, biphobic or transphobic behaviour that happens to you or you see happening. This could be in your workplace, in public, or online. You can also support your LGBTQ friends when you hear they’ve been a victim of an attack.

It’s your choice of when and how you are a visible LGBTQ role model or ally. It’s OK not to be visible all the time.